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aruba

MRO´s with Line Approval (pre-filtered)

Authority Information

A certificate of airworthiness for an Aruban aircraft is issued on request of its owner or operator after the airworthiness inspection is conducted satisfactorily. 
The Certificate of Airworthiness (C of A) in Aruba is valid for a maximum period of twelve (12) months from the date of issue, for aircraft operating in accordance with either AUA-OPS 1 or 2.
To proceed with the initial issue of a certificate of airworthiness for an aircraft operating in Aruba, please complete and submit form INS-4.009.
The AMC-012 can be used as guide for the person or organization who will be presenting the aircraft and its associated records to a DCA airworthiness inspector. 
The person presenting the aircraft and its records would normally be the operator’s Airworthiness Coordinator or Maintenance Post holder. In the case of aircraft operated commercially unless different arrangements are agreed on an individual basis in advance with the DCA. This person is responsible, prior to the aircraft inspection, for ensuring that the aircraft and its associated records are available for inspection and meet the DCA’s standards and requirements.
The AUA-RLW details the requirements governing the airworthiness certification of an aircraft.

A Type Certificate (TC) and the associated Type Certificate Data Sheets (TCDS) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of the United States, Transport Canada, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), or Brazil will be acceptable to the DCA.
In practice, this means that the DCA will accept an aircraft from any of the above NAAs without the aircraft having to undergo any modifications to revert it to the certification standard of the State of Design.
The Type Acceptance Certificate (TAC) covers the entire aircraft and any engine/airframe combination covered by the TCDS.
In the matter of STCs embodied on an aircraft, the DCA will accept without further review any STC that has been previously approved by the above National Aviation Authorities.  These STCs will be accepted when the DCA first issues the aircraft Certificate of Airworthiness.
If an aircraft type has never been registered in Aruba before, a formal request must be submitted to have the applicable Type Certificate accepted by the DCA of Aruba.
The AUA-RLW addresses the certification of aircraft and related products, parts and appliances.

The operator of an Aruban registered aircraft is responsible for ensuring that their aircraft is airworthy and have in place the appropriate arrangements for continuing airworthiness management. 
However, AUA-OPS 2 (GA) Aruban operators are at liberty of contracting an approved Continuing Airworthiness Management Organization (CAMO) to fulfill continuing airworthiness-associated tasks (no DCA Aruba approval is required for this). 
Refer to the Directors Decree no. DLA / 2007-001 dated 6 March 2007 for information concerning continuing airworthiness. Refer to AMC-012 for further documents required for the DCA airworthiness inspection.

The continuing airworthiness of the aircraft shall be determined in relation to the appropriate airworthiness requirements in force for that aircraft.    
 The application for the renewal of a C of A for an aircraft registered in Aruba can be made by using form INS-4.009. The application may be submitted up to sixty (60) days prior to the expiry of the current certificate with no loss of validity or periodicity. 
 At least thirty (30) days before expiry the operator shall provide their registration officer an estimated date and location for the renewal inspection.
 The person presenting the aircraft and its records would normally be the operator’s Airworthiness Coordinator or Maintenance Post holder in the case of aircraft operated commercially unless different arrangements are agreed on an individual basis in advance with the DCA.
 This person is responsible, prior to the aircraft inspection, for ensuring that the aircraft and its associated records are available for inspection and meet the DCA’s standards and requirements.
 The AMC-012 can be used as guide for the person or organization who will be presenting the aircraft and its associated records to a DCA airworthiness inspector.

All aircraft registered in Aruba shall be equipped with an Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELT) or a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) as required by Aruba regulation: AUA-OPS 2.4.12.1 & AUA-OPS 1.820.

During the initial registration a copy of logbook entry or work order recording that the new mode-S code has been entered in the transponder should be submitted to the DCA. The same applies for the ELT and SATCOM as applicable. When programming the ELT country code 307 shall be used for Aruba.
The DCA will provide you with your unique Mode-S and ELT Codes upon submission of INS. 4.009.
The information required for the initial registration of the ELTs is listed in form INS-16.008.

All test flights and ferry flights require prior DCA approval, as well as approval from all States over-flown. The application for a Special Flight Permit can be made by using form INS-4.034.

Special Flight Permit can be granted to the operator of an aircraft only for the purpose of flying the aircraft to a place where maintenance, permanent repair or alterations are to be performed; or for the purpose of conducting a flight associated with the approval of a modification.

AUA-RLW details the requirements for the issue and renewal of a Special Flight Permit. 

Aruban-registered aircraft are required to be maintained by maintenance technicians or maintenance repair organizations (MRO) licensed or certificated by the DCA of Aruba (DCA).
The DCA of Aruba accepts maintenance repair organizations approved by several competent authorities listed here below, without the need of an on-site audit. Those maintenance repair organizations have met the equivalent standard of AUA-RLW regulation within the scope of work as stated in the approval. 
• EASA Part 145 organization, using an EASA Part 145 approval number; and
• UAE GCAA CAR 145 organization, using a GCAA CAR 145 approval number
• Singapore CAAS SAR Part 145 organization, using a CAAS SAR Part 145 approval number
• Hong Kong CAD HKAR-145 Part 145, using a HKAR-145 Part 145 approval number
• UK CAA Part 145. using a UK CAA Part 145 approval number 

The DCA of Aruba will require to conduct an on-site audit to an MRO based on the following criteria:
•       MRO’s not holding an approval from the above-mentioned authorities.
•       MRO’s providing service to an aircraft operating commercially (AUA-OPS1), regardless of holding any of the approvals listed above. 

In order to apply for a DCA acceptance or validation a written request via email shall be submitted to your registration officer, together with the following documentation:•       Application Form INS-4.065
•       Part 145 Certificate & Ops Specs reflecting aircraft capabilities
•       Sample CRS with reference to the Aruba Regulations (AUA-RLW)
•       List of Authorized Personnel for Release to Service
•       Yearly Training Schedule
•       Yearly Audit Schedule
•       Maintenance Organization Exposition (MOE)
•       Quality Assurance (QA) Program and Instruction Procedures Manual (IPM), if not included in the MOE
•       MOE Aruba Supplement

For further information on how to obtain your Aruban MRO acceptances, please contact us at hello@p4registry.com

A maintenance release shall be completed and signed to certify that the maintenance work has been performed in accordance with the maintenance programme or other data and procedures acceptable to the DCA. 

A maintenance release shall contain a certification including: 
a) basic details of the maintenance performed; 
b) the date such maintenance was completed; 
c) when applicable, the identity of the approved maintenance organization; and 
 d) the identity of the person or persons signing the release. 

Regarding the CRS sample listed in the guidelines, please refer to the DCA of Aruba Notice No. DL/13531 with a recommendation concerning to the maintenance release statement for the aircraft:

Unless already accomplished, all holders of DCA issued Certificate of Acceptance are required to amend their release statements applicable to aircraft registered in Aruba in order to replace the reference to “Other Competent Authority PART 145 (ie. EASA Part 145)” by “AUA-RLW”.

It is recommended to refer to the Aruba DCA approval number following the release statement.

Prior to the de-registration of an aircraft the DCA may issue an Export Certificate of Airworthiness, only if requested by the operator and only if required by the Importing State.
To issue an Export Certificate of Airworthiness the aircraft shall undergo an export airworthiness inspection by the DCA. An export certificate of airworthiness confirms that on the date the aircraft was inspected by DCA it was found to be airworthy and compliant with the relevant design requirements.
Should an export be required, the operator should submit INS. 4.009EX. Together with the application the contact information of the importing authority needs to be provided.

The DCA of Aruba requires that the operator of a privately managed aircraft have a Maintenances Control Manual (MCM). In order to show compliance with Aruba’s AUA-OPS 2 regulation, you at the initial registration you are required to submit  Company Manuals Compliance Statement checklist INS-3.056CC. 
A full description of the DCA policies and guidance on acceptable MCM is contained in AMC-038 | AUA-OPS 2 Manuals 
The owner/operator’s Airworthiness Coordinator is required to outline in INS-4.009 the details of the nominated airworthiness coordinator, those organizations with contracts to perform line and base maintenance, subcontracting of continuing airworthiness tasks, and the records system in use and details of any contracted validated Licensed Aircraft Engineers.
The DCA allows aircraft maintenance engineers that hold a DCA license validation to perform limited line maintenance and defect rectification. A formal application for a license validation can be made using form INS-4.026.

The operator must ensure that the aeroplane/helicopter is maintained in accordance with the operator’s aeroplane/helicopter maintenance programme. The programme must contain details, including frequency, of all maintenance and inspections required to be carried out. The programme will be required to include a reliability programme when the DCA of Aruba determines that such a reliability programme is necessary.

M.I.P. for Aircraft Operated under AUA OPS 2 (GA)
The AMP Commitment Statement for an aircraft operated in Aruba privately under AUA OPS 2 | General Aviation (Aeroplanes) is required to be accepted by the DCA before a Certificate of Airworthiness can be issued.
The owner/operator’s Airworthiness Coordinator is required to submit form INS-4.070 as part of requirements for the initial C of A. Upon satisfactorily review the DCA will formally accept the Maintenance Commitment Letter.

M.I.P. for Aircraft Operated under AUA-OPS 1 (CAT)
The Maintenance Program for an aircraft operated commercially under an ICAO Article 83bis agreement or an Aruban AOC utilizing AUA OPS 1 | Commercial Air Transport is required to be approved by the DCA before a Certificate of Airworthiness can be issued.
The operator shall develop its own maintenance program based on among others the MPD, MRB, former operator’s maintenance programme, powerplant and propeller’s manufacturer’s requirements and recommendations.
A full description of the DCA policies and guidance on acceptable maintenance programs are contained in AMC 17 – Operators Maintenance Inspection Programme.

1.   What is the validity period of the Certificate of Airworthiness (CoA)?
The Certificate of Airworthiness (CoA) has a validity period of twelve (12) months and can be renewed within the last remaining sixty (60) days of your current certificate, without it affecting your validity date.

 2.   Will the aircraft be required to fly to Aruba to complete the airworthiness renewal process?
No, there is no need to fly the aircraft to Aruba.

3.   What are the DCA Aruba requirements for CAMO?
DCA of Aruba has no requirements concerning CAMO organization approvals as the operator is responsible to fulfill continuing airworthiness associated tasks of the aircraft. (Refer to the Continuing Airworthiness Instructions)

4.   What aircraft records will be reviewed by the DCA Inspector during the airworthiness inspection of the aircraft?
Please refer to the AMC-012 Maintenance Record Keeping Instructions.

5.   What Part 145 Foreign Maintenance Facilities do not require and on-site audit by Aruba?
The DCA of Aruba will accept a maintenance organization from the following approved authorities without requiring an on-site audit: EASA 145, Singapore CAAS SAR 145, UAE GCAA 145 and Hong Kong HKCA.
In the case an MRO wishes to apply for an Aruba Certificate of Validation with a different Certificate of Acceptance (such as FAA for example), a physical audit of the facility would be a requirement. 

6.   What is the overview of the process to obtain an Aruba Certificate of Approval /Validation for a foreign based MRO?
For a Part 145 Facility, the following documentation must be submitted:
• Written request
• Application Form INS-4.065
• Local Certificate & Ops Specs
• Authorized Personnel for Release to Service
• Training Schedule
• Audit Schedule
• Sample CRS
• MOE (Including Quality Program)
In the case an MRO wishes to apply for an Aruba Certificate of Validation with a non- Part 145 Certificate (such as FAA for example), a physical audit of the facility would be a requirement in addition to submitting the documents listed above.

7.   What is the difference between a Certificate of Acceptance and a Certificate of Validation?
A Certificate of Acceptance is based on the foreign facility’s valid Part 145 Certificate for which no physical audit is required, simply a desktop audit of the necessary documentation.
A Certificate of validation is issued when the foreign facility does not hold a Part 145 Certificate, so a physical audit is required.

8.   How long does a typical process last (when no audit is required)?
Once all the paperwork has been submitted and payment is received, the certificates are normally issued within 48 hours.

9.   What is the duration of a maintenance Acceptance-Validation Certificate?
The Certificates of Approval and Validation are valid for a period of up to 2 years. The validity shall not extend beyond the expiration date of the foreign license.

10.   What is a one- time approval process for an MRO?
The DCA may issue a one-time approval to an MRO only in the case of non-routine maintenance (for example aircraft break down at an outstation, a modification of repair). 
In order to obtain a one-time authorization, the following shall be submitted to the DCA:
• Copy of local maintenance approval or acceptance certificate;
• A description of the scope of work to be accomplished.

11.  What are the requirements from Aruba regarding the Sample CRS?
Regarding the CRS sample listed in the guidelines, please refer to the DCA of Aruba Notice No. DL/13531 with a recommendation concerning to the maintenance release statement for the aircraft:
Unless already accomplished, all holders of DCA issued Certificate of Acceptance are required to amend their release statements applicable to aircraft registered in Aruba in order to replace the reference to “Other Competent Authority PART 145 (ie. EASA Part 145)” by “AUA-RLW”.
 It is recommended to refer to the Aruba DCA approval number following the release statement.

12.  Can a Special Flight Permit be issued for an aircraft w/o a CoA?
Yes, a Special Flight Permit can be issued for an aircraft w/o a CoA. The aircraft will receive an Interim Certificate of Airworthiness and the pilots conducting the ferry flight will be issued a Special Authorization.

The Registry of Aruba is available to private, corporate, & commercial aircraft owners & operators with a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 5,700 kgs or more and helicopters with a maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of 1,000 kgs or more. 
Aircraft registered in Aruba are given flexibility when choosing their registration marks. Aruba’s P4 (PAPA 4), nationality mark is followed by any sequence of either three letters or numbers; enabling the owner or operator to customize their aircraft registration marks and create attractive, suggestive, and vanity tail combinations. 
The full registration process is clear-cut and can be achieved in 24-48 hours upon a successful airworthiness inspection and satisfactory receipt of all the necessary documentation.

The registration of an aircraft in Aruba has initiated once a formal e-mail request is submitted by the operator including the aircraft location and desired dates of the airworthiness inspection; aircraft serial number and model; desired registration marks; and completed INS. 4.014. 

Our official memorandum DOM 01 that offers a complete overview of the person or company who qualifies to hold ownership of an aircraft registered in Aruba. While also listing the critical elements enacted when electing domicile and provides a list of the countries that qualify to complete aircraft registration in Aruba through this legislation.

The registration of an aircraft under the domicile regime does not create a taxable presence in Aruba, and it eliminates the need to form an Aruban company or corporation. Thus, by utilizing the domicile regimen, qualified foreign legal-corporate entities & U.S. Trustees can keep their existing company structure when registering in Aruba.

Complete application form IASO A-80 for aircraft registration via domicile. Submit along with IASO form A-80 articles of incorporation and letter of good standing of the company appointed as the registering entity, along with additional compliance documentation. 

For an aircraft to be operated the applicable regulation privately is AUA OPS 2 (General Aviation Aeroplanes), or AUA OPS 2 (H) for General Aviation Operations for Helicopters.

For an aircraft to be operated commercially using an Aruba AOC or under a foreign AOC utilizing an ICAO Article 83bis agreement, the applicable regulation is AUA OPS 1 (Commercial Air Transport).

Foreign legal corporate entities and U.S. trustees can keep their existing company structures be electing to register their aircraft in Aruba via domicile. 

For further information on how to register your aircraft via domicile, please contact us at hello@p4registry.com

AMC 024  | Minimum Equipment List provides guidance and specifies the means for an operator to produce MELs and procedures, so that an aircraft with unserviceable equipment may be dispatched in accordance with the applicable requirements of AUA OPS.

For aircraft operated commercially under AUA OPS 1, the approval of the MEL will be part of the AOC approval process.

Since Aruba’s DCA recognizes that the preparation of an MEL for submission can take a considerable period of time, we will consider applications from General Aviation (AUA-OPS 2) aircraft for the issue of a Permission to use the Master Minimum Equipment List for up to 90 days.

Before the 90-day expiration mark, the operator is responsible for submitting thei customized MEL for approval by the DCA, at which point if found acceptable they shall recieve their final MEL approval. 

The MMEL Permission can be requested using form INS-3.059.

Note: This MMEL authorization can not be granted to Part NCC operators, as per EASA’s requirements; any operator based in Europe, at the time of initial registration must hold a customized MEL to submit for approval. 

Any organization that wishes to operate an aircraft for the purpose of Commercial Air Transport, may alternately choose to operate commercially under a foreign AOC utilizing an ICAO Article 83bis Agreement.

An ICAO Article 83bis Agreement defines the division of regulatory oversight responsibilities between Aruba, as the State of Registry, and a foreign civil aviation authority, as State of the Operator, in relation to the operation of the Aruban registered aircraft.

This means that through this agreement, an aircraft registered in Aruba can be operated for commercial purposes by a foreign AOC holder.

In order to initiate and 83bis Agreement with Aruba the operator must submit (2) two official letters: One letter addressed to our DCA of Aruba (see template letter below); and another letter addressed to the CAA of the State of Operator (same text can be used to draft the official letter to both authorities).

The submission of the official letters will lead to both States to commence formal meetings / discussions to support your request.

For further information on the 83bis Agreement process, please contact us at hello@p4registry.com

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